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Chronological List of German Churches in New Orleans

Clicking on a linked church name immediately below will take you to the section about that church farther down on this page. The list shows the names of the churches as they existed in 1893. Most have different names today and some are no longer in existence. Within the information on a number of churches, there are links to additional sources, such as further information on the organization and availability of the records, the various names of the church, and the names of the clergy who served it.

  1. First German Protestant Church and Congregation of New Orleans (1826)
      [First Trinity Evangelical United Church of Christ]
  2. German Evangelical-Lutheran St. Paul Congregation (1840)
      [St. Paul Lutheran Church]
  3. First German Methodist Episcopal Church (1840)
  4.  German Catholic St. Mary’s Assumption Church Parish in Lafayette (1843)
      [St. Mary’s Assumption Church]
  5. German Evangelical Church and Congregation in Lafayette (1846)
      [Jackson Avenue Evangelical Congregation]
  6. German Evangelical St. Matthew Church and Congregation in Carrollton (1847)
      [St. Matthew United Church of Christ]
  7. Craps [Burgundy] Street German Methodist Episcopal Church of the South (1847)
  8. German Catholic Church of the Holy Trinity (1847)
      [Holy Trinity Church]
  9. German Catholic Mater Dolorosa Church in Carrollton (1847)
      [Mater Dolorosa Church]
10. German Evangelical Lutheran Zion Church (1848)
      [Zion Lutheran Church]
11. German Evangelical Lutheran St. John Church (1852)
      [St. John Lutheran Church]
12. Soraparu Street German Methodist Episcopal Church of the South (1853)
13. First German Presbyterian Church (1853)
      [First Street Presbyterian Church]
14. German Evangelical-Lutheran (Kleinhagen’s) Bethlehem Church (1854)
15. German Catholic St. Henry’s Church (1855)
      [St. Henry’s Church]
16. German-English Catholic St. Joseph’s Parish in Gretna (1857)
      [St. Joseph Church, Gretna]
17. Second German-Presbyterian Church of New Orleans (1862)
      [Peace Presbyterian Church]
18. German Evangelical Church on Milan Street (1862)
      [Salem United Church of Christ]
19. German Evangelical Lutheran Salem Congregation in Gretna (1866)
      [Salem Lutheran Church, Gretna]
20. Felicity Road German Methodist Episcopal Church of the North (1868)
21. German Catholic Saint Boniface Church (1869)
      [St. Boniface Church]
22. Second German Methodist Episcopal Church of the North (1870)
23. Third German Methodist Episcopal Church of the North (1874)
24. German Evangelical Lutheran Trinity Congregation in Algiers (1875)
      [Trinity Lutheran Church]
25. German Presbyterian Emmanuel Church of the North (1877)
26. German Evangelical Lutheran Emmanuel Church (1881)
      [Immanuel Lutheran Church]
 

1. First German Protestant Church and Congregation of New Orleans (1826)
Deiler, pages 11-17
Presently: First Trinity Evangelical United Church of Christ

     Organized in 1828, this was the first German-speaking, protestant congregation in New Orleans. For most of its early history, it was located on Clio Street, between St. Charles and Carondelet Streets, and was often referred to as the “Clio Street Church.” The church is known today as First Trinity Evangelical United Church of Christ.
     The original records are held by the church. They include baptism and marriage records, but due to their extreme fragility, they are not made available to the public. The existing records have been microfilmed, but they are unorganized and are described as fragmented and incomplete. The microfilmed records are available to be viewed at the Historic New Orleans Collection and at the German American Cultural Center in Gretna.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

2. German Evangelical-Lutheran St. Paul Congregation (1840)
Deiler, pages 17-26
Originally: German Orthodox Evangelical Congregation of New Orleans and Lafayette
Formerly: First German Lutheran Congregation of New Orleans
Presently: St. Paul Lutheran Church

     Organized in 1840, this was the first German-speaking protestant church to serve downtown New Orleans. By 1843 it was located at the corner of Port and Craps (now Burgundy) Streets, where it stands today as St. Paul Lutheran Church.
     The earliest original records, 1840-1844, are held in the Manuscript Department of the Tulane University Library. Some of these records have been indexed in New Orleans Genesis. The original baptism, confirmation, marriage, and death records from 1844 to 1947 are held at the Concordia Historical Institute, St. Louis, Missouri.
     These records are available online here. Microfilmed copies are available on three rolls of microfilm at the Louisiana Division of the New Orleans Public Library and through any Family History Center.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

3. First German Methodist Episcopal Church (1840)
Deiler, pages 26-28

     This church, organized in 1840, was originally located on Melicerte (now Erato) Street. It was later moved to Dryades Street (between Euterpe and Felicity) and became the Dryades Street Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1906, it merged with the Felicity Road Methodist Episcopal Church (see number 20 below).
     Further information is needed on the history of this church and the status of its records.

4. German Catholic St. Mary’s Assumption Church Parish in Lafayette (1843)
Deiler, pages 29-36
Presently: St. Mary’s Assumption Catholic Church

     Organized in 1843, St. Mary’s Assumption was the first church formed specifically to serve the German Catholics in the City of Lafayette, part of today’s “uptown” New Orleans. (The City of Lafayette was incorporated into New Orleans as the Fourth Municipal District in 1852.) St. Mary’s Assumption Church still stands at 2030 Constance Street.
     The original records, from 1843 forward, are held by the New Orleans Archdiocesan Archives, and include baptism, marriage, death, and confirmation records. Indexes to some of the records have been published in New Orleans Genesis.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

5. German Evangelical Church and Congregation in Lafayette (1846)
Deiler, pages 37-45
Presently: Jackson Avenue Evangelical Congregation

     Organized in 1846, this church was originally located at Philip and Chippewa Streets in the City of Lafayette. (The City of Lafayette was incorporated into New Orleans as the Fourth Municipal District in 1852.) In 1876, a new church was completed at the corner of Jackson Avenue and Chippewa Street, which still stands today. The church is known today as the Jackson Avenue Evangelical Congregation.
     The original records, from 1846 on, are held by the church, and include baptism, marriage, death, and confirmation records. The records have been microfilmed and are available to be viewed at the Historic New Orleans Collection. Indexes to some records have been published in New Orleans Genesis.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

6. German Evangelical St. Matthew Church and Congregation in Carrollton (1847)
Deiler, pages 45-49
Presently: St. Matthew United Church of Christ

     Officially organized in 1849 [1847 according to Deiler], this venerable congregation has a fascinating history. The first church, on Zimpel Street between Monroe and Leonidas Streets, was called the “Rooster Church,” because of the weathercock on the steeple. In 1854, some members opposed to the selection of Ludwig P. Heintz as Pastor, formed their own Evangelical Church of Carrollton, and erected a building on Madison Street near Third Street. This church, served by Pastor Martin Otto, came to be called the “Otto Church.” In 1884, the congregations reconciled, calling themselves the German Evangelical Church of the Seventh District of Carrollton. A new church building was completed by 1890, and the congregation called themselves the German Evangelical St. Matthew Church.
     The original records are held by the church and have not been microfilmed. There are some records from the 1847 period, but most of the baptism, marriage, death, and confirmation records date from 1874.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

7. Craps [Burgundy] Street German Methodist Episcopal Church of the South (1847)
Deiler, pages 49-51

     Organized in 1847, this church was located on Craps (now Burgundy) Street, between today’s Franklin Avenue and St. Roch Avenue, at what was 2529 Burgundy Street. The name was changed to Burgundy Street Methodist Episcopal Church in 1899.
     Information is needed on the history of this church and the status of its records.
 

8. German Catholic Church of the Holy Trinity (1847)
Deiler, pages 51-58
No longer exists as a congregation.

     Holy Trinity Catholic Church was founded in 1847 to serve the German-speaking Catholics of downtown New Orleans (in the Third District). The church building (constructed in 1853) still stands today at 721 St. Ferdinand Street (between Dauphine and Royal Streets). Holy Trinity was deconsecrated by the Archdiocese on March 31, 1997, and the church building was sold to a private individual.
     The original records, from 1847 through the closing of the church, are held by the New Orleans Archdiocesan Archives, and include baptism, marriage, death, and confirmation records. Indexes to some of the records have been published in New Orleans Genesis.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

9. German Catholic Mater Dolorosa Church in Carrollton (1847)
Deiler, pages 58-61
Presently: Mater Dolorosa Catholic Church

     Mater Dolorosa Church was founded in 1847 to serve the German-speaking Catholics of the City of Carrollton. (The City of Carrollton, once in Jefferson Parish, was incorporated into New Orleans as the Seventh Municipal District in 1874.) The first church in which they worshipped was constructed in 1848 on Cambronne Street. In 1871 a new church intended for the exclusive use of the German Catholics was built across Cambronne Street. The church is currently located at 1228 S. Carrollton Avenue.
     The earliest records, beginning in 1848, are held by the New Orleans Archdiocesan Archives, and include baptism, marriage, death, and confirmation records. Indexes to some of the records have been published in New Orleans Genesis.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

10. German Evangelical Lutheran Zion Church (1848)
Deiler, pages 61-64
Presently: Zion Lutheran Church

     The congregation was officially organized in 1848 as the Evangelical-Lutheran Zion Church. Their first church building was constructed in 1849 on Euterpe Street, between Baronne and Dryades. In 1871, the congregation dedicated a new church on St. Charles Avenue, at the corner of St. Andrew Street. This church is still in use today at 1924 St. Charles Avenue.
     The original records are held by the congregation. They include baptism, marriage, burial, and confirmation records. The records have been microfilmed and are available to be viewed at the Historic New Orleans Collection.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

11. German Evangelical Lutheran St. John Church (1852)
Deiler, pages 65-69
Presently: Saint John Lutheran Church

     Some members of the Clio Street Church (see number 1 above) departed in 1852 and organized themselves as the Evangelical-Lutheran St. John Congregation. They soon built a church on Customhouse Street (now Iberville) at N. Prieur Street. Some time after 1893, the congregation constructed its present church building at 3937 Canal Street.
     The original records are held by the congregation. They include baptism, marriage, burial, and confirmation records. The records have not been microfilmed and are not available to the public.
The church's address is:
     Saint John Lutheran Church
     3937 Canal Street
     New Orleans, LA  70119-6002
Link to additional information on this church and its records

12. Soraparu Street German Methodist Episcopal Church of the South (1853)
Deiler, pages 71-72

     Organized in 1853 for the German Methodists in the City of Lafayette, this church was located on Soraparu Street, between Chippewa and Annunciation Streets.
     Further information is needed on the history of this church and the status of its records.

13. First German Presbyterian Church (1853)
Deiler, pages 72-75
Later: First Street Presbyterian Church
No longer exists as a congregation (dissolved about 1983)

     Members of the German Evangelical Church in Lafayette (see number 5 above) left that church and incorporated themselves in 1854 as the First German Presbyterian Church. They met in a private home until completing a church in 1856 on First Street, between Laurel and Annunciation Streets. Remaining in its original location, the church changed its name to First Street Presbyterian Church. The church was dissolved about 1983.
     The original records (1853-1983) are held by the Presbyterian Historical Society, in Montreat, North Carolina. The records are not online and the staff does not do genealogical research, although visitors can view the records in person or can hire a local researcher.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

14. German Evangelical-Lutheran (Kleinhagen’s) Bethlehem Church (1854)
Deiler, page 76

     Organized in 1854, this church was the “private property” of the Rev. Johann Heinrich Kleinhagen. This church was served by a variety of pastors, until its closing in 1890.
     Deiler noted in 1894 that: “The church registers of the former Kleinhagen congregation are at this time in the possession of Herr Wilhelm Kleinhagen, a son of the founder of the Bethlehem Church.” The whereabouts of these records today is not known.

15. German Catholic St. Henry’s Church (1855)
Deiler, pages 77-78
Presently: St. Henry’s Catholic Church

     The church was organized in 1855 to serve the German Catholics of Jefferson City (which was incorporated into New Orleans as the Sixth District in 1870). Originally served by the Lazarist Fathers, the congregation was later turned over to the New Orleans Archdiocese. The original frame church was constructed in 1856 on Berlin Street (now General Pershing Street). The present brick church was built in 1925 at the same location.
     The earliest records, beginning in 1856, are held by the New Orleans Archdiocesan Archives, and include baptism, marriage, death, and confirmation records. Indexes to some of the records and a history of the church have been published in New Orleans Genesis.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

16. German-English Catholic St. Joseph’s Parish in Gretna (1857)
Deiler, pages 80-81
Presently: St. Joseph Catholic Church, Gretna

     This congregation, organized in 1857, was located in Gretna (Jefferson Parish). The first church building, located at Lavoisier and Sixth Streets, was erected in 1858, but was destroyed by flood waters. The replacement church was used until 1926, when the present edifice, on Lavoisier and South Streets, was constructed.
     The earliest records, beginning in 1857, are held by the New Orleans Archdiocesan Archives, and include baptism, marriage, death, and confirmation records.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

17. Second German-Presbyterian Church of New Orleans (1862)
Deiler, pages 84-87
Later: Claiborne Avenue Presbyterian Church
Presently: Peace Presbyterian Church

     The Second German Presbyterian Church was founded in 1862 by a few disaffected members of the German Orthodox Evangelical Church (see number 2). Their first permanent church building was a former Presbyterian church moved to St. Claude and Poet (now St. Roch) Streets. The church later relocated to North Claiborne Avenue and Allen Street, and was eventually renamed as the Claiborne Avenue Presbyterian Church. In recent years, the congregation moved to Morrison Road, and is known today as Peace Presbyterian Church.
     The original records (1863-1931) are held by the Presbyterian Historical Society, in Montreat, North Carolina. The records are not online and the staff does not do genealogical research, although a local researcher will do a search for a fee. Microfilmed copies of the records, some of which are indexed, are available at the Louisiana Division of the New Orleans Public Library and at the Historic New Orleans Collection.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

18. German Evangelical Church on Milan Street (1862)
Deiler, pages 87-90
Formerly: First German Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Sixth District
Presently: Salem United Church of Christ

     When this church was first organized (8 March 1863), it was located in what was then Jefferson City (which in 1870 was incorporated into New Orleans as the Sixth District). By March 1866, the church had its first building, located on Milan Street, at the corner of Camp Street. The church was later renamed the German Evangelical Church on Milan Street. The church was an independent congregation until 1891, when it affiliated with the Evangelical Synod of North America, which later became part of the Evangelical and Reformed Church and then later still, the United Church of Christ. Today it is the Salem United Church of Christ.
     The church has excellent records (baptism, marriage, death, confirmation) and maintains the originals. Microfilmed copies of the records (1863-1941), as well as the church’s newsletter, the Salem Echo, are available on three rolls of microfilm at the Louisiana Division of the New Orleans Public Library and Family History Centers.
Link to additional information on this church and its records

19. German Evangelical Lutheran Salem Congregation in Gretna (1866)
Deiler, pages 90-93
Formerly: Evangelical-Protestant German Congregation
Originally: German Evangelical Presbyterian Church of the North
Presently: Salem Lutheran Church, Gretna

     Originally organized as a Presbyterian congregation in 1866, this church in Gretna was officially chartered in 1871. The following year, the congregation laid the cornerstone for its church. Later, it was organized as the Evangelical-Protestant German Congregation. In 1880, they reorganized as the German Evangelical Lutheran Salem Congregation in Gretna.
     Information is needed on the history of this church and the status of its records.

20. Felicity Road German Methodist Episcopal Church of the North (1868)
Deiler, pages 94-95

     This church was started by a group of former members of the Dryades Street Church (see number 3 above), and was organized in 1868. The congregation received a charter in 1871, and that same year constructed a building and parsonage at the corner of Franklin (now Simon Bolivar) and St. Andrew Streets.
     Information is needed on the history of this church and the status of its records.

21. German Catholic Saint Boniface Church (1869)
Deiler, pages 95-98
Later: St. Boniface Catholic Church
No longer exists as a congregation.

     This parish was organized in 1869 as a “filial” or daughter church of Holy Trinity Church (see number 8 above) to serve the German Catholics who lived and worked in the “back part” of the Second and Third Districts that were near the Fair Grounds and Gentilly Road. Many of the members were “gardeners” or farmers who raised produce for sale in the city. Their first building, which served as a church and school, was constructed at Lapeyrouse and Galvez Streets. In 1893, a new church was constructed at Galvez and Laharpe Streets.
     St. Boniface Parish was suppressed in February, 1917. The nearby Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Church had been destroyed in the 1915 hurricane. The former St. Boniface Church then became Our Lady of the Sacred Heart. This church, in turn, burned down in August 1945.
     The earliest records, beginning in 1869, are held by the New Orleans Archdiocesan Archives, and include baptism, marriage, death, and confirmation records.

22. Second German Methodist Episcopal Church of the North (1870)
Deiler, pages 98-99

     The Rev. Philipp Barth and thirty of his members left the Soraparu Street Methodist Church (see number 12 above) over sectional differences within the Methodist Church. They organized a new congregation in 1870 and constructed a church the following year at the corner of Eighth and Laurel Streets.
     Information is needed on the history of this church and the status of its records.

23. Third German Methodist Episcopal Church of the North (1874)
Deiler, pages 99-100

     In May 1874, sectional differences in the Methodist Church led the Rev. Jakob Ueber to establish this German congregation in the Third District (that part of New Orleans below Esplanade Avenue). The congregation first met at Ueber’s home. A church was soon built on Rampart Street, between St. Ferdinand and Press Streets.
     Information is needed on the history of this church and the status of its records.

24. German Evangelical Lutheran Trinity Congregation in Algiers (1875)
Deiler, pages 100-101
Presently: Trinity Lutheran Church

     This church was organized in 1875 to serve the Lutherans in Algiers and was first served by the Pastor of St. John (see number 10 above). By 1876, the congregation finished construction of a church at Olivier and Eliza Streets, which remains today. The address is 620 Eliza Street. The congregation has a website here: http://sites.google.com/site/trinityalgierspoint/
     Some historical information on the church can be found here and here.
     Information is needed on the status of its records.

25. German Presbyterian Emmanuel Church of the North (1877)
Deiler, pages 101-103

     In 1877, Pastor Owen Riedy and a number of members left the German Evangelical Church (see number 18 above) and formed the Soniat Street German Presbyterian Church. By 1880 the congregation owned a building and had changed its name to Emmanuel Presbyterian Church.
     Information is needed on the history of this church and the status of its records.

26. German Evangelical Lutheran Emmanuel Church (1881)
Deiler, pages 107-108
No longer exists as a congregation.

     This church, organized in 1881 by Johann F. Döscher [John F. Doescher], was originally located on St. Louis Street, between N. Johnson and N. Prieur Streets. Doescher, a Missouri Synod pastor at St. John's (see number 10 above), began secretly conducting English-language services in a rented hall in 1879, unbeknownst to his St. John's congregation. He apparently also desired to separate himself from the Missouri Synod, so he withdrew in January 1882, organizing the congregation as Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Congregation and joining the Joint Synod of Ohio. The church was later located at 134 N. Broad Street.
     Immanuel merged into Grace Lutheran Church on April 22, 1990. Grace was a daughter congregation of Immanuel, organized in 1899. The original records may be held at Grace Lutheran Church, but they have been microfilmed and are available at the following:
     Family History Centers
The records of the church are on FHL film number 1312129, which contains baptisms, confirmations, marriages, burials, and lists of communicants: 1881-1898, 1898-1915, and 1916-1932. See:
http://goo.gl/ymgfO
and
http://goo.gl/iSL8y


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